Prostate hyperplasia (BPH), or simply an enlarged prostate, is a serious problem among men, especially those over age 60. As I’ve pointed out, high testosterone levels are not a precursor to an enlarged prostate or cancer; rather, excessive DHT and estrogen levels formed as metabolites of testosterone are. Conventional medicine uses two classes of drugs to treat BPH, each having a number of serious side effects. These are:

Epidemiological evidence supports a link between testosterone and glucose metabolism. Studies in non-diabetic men have found an inverse correlation of total or free testosterone with glucose and insulin levels (Simon et al 1992; Haffner et al 1994) and studies show lower testosterone levels in patients with the metabolic syndrome (Laaksonen et al 2003; Muller et al 2005; Kupelian et al 2006) or diabetes (Barrett-Connor 1992; Andersson et al 1994; Rhoden et al 2005). A study of patients with type 2 diabetes using measurement of serum free testosterone by the gold standard method of equilibrium dialysis, found a 33% prevalence of biochemical hypogonadism (Dhindsa et al 2004). The Barnsley study demonstrated a high prevalence of clinical and biochemical hypogonadism with 19% having total testosterone levels below 8 nmol/l and a further 25% between 8–12 nmol/l (Kapoor, Aldred et al 2007). There are also a number longitudinal studies linking low serum testosterone levels to the future development of the metabolic syndrome (Laaksonen et al 2004) or type 2 diabetes (Haffner et al 1996; Tibblin et al 1996; Stellato et al 2000; Oh et al 2002; Laaksonen et al 2004), indicating a possible role of hypogonadism in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes in men. Alternatively, it has been postulated that obesity may be the common link between low testosterone levels and insulin resistance, diabetes and cardiovascular disease (Phillips et al 2003; Kapoor et al 2005). With regard to this hypothesis, study findings vary as to whether the association of testosterone with diabetes occurs independently of obesity (Haffner et al 1996; Laaksonen et al 2003; Rhoden et al 2005).
My question is in two parts, I am looking for energy and some muscle build but only do push ups and sit ups so not looking for massive results. I am diabetic and I am wanting to get a testosterone booster to have more energy for daily use not so much for help in the bedroom but I would not mind if it helps out. Would I be able to take it not just for a certain product but any testosterone booster? The other question is does it help with any form of muscle growth, again not anything big but some? I would appreciate any advice or information you can give me.
Keep more weapons in your arsenal: Occasionally use lifting methods like forced reps, negatives, and dropsets to further stress your body. Personal trainer and fitness journalist Michael Berg explains in "6 Ways to Crank Up Your Testosterone Levels" that going beyond muscular failure with these techniques has been shown to pump up T-levels in study subjects.[16]
Any day that you don’t get 20 minutes of direct sunlight on your skin, you want to supplement with 5,000 IUs of vitamin D3. If you get your blood levels tested and you’re extremely low — below 50 IUs — you typically want to do 5,000 IUs twice a day for three months until you get those numbers up. You can do everything in the world, but if your vitamin D levels aren’t right, your testosterone levels will stay low.
Dr. Anthony’s Notes: Vitamin D has about 100 other beneficial body functions outside of it's impact on testosterone. Make sure you take the active Vitamin D3 (not D2 – from plant sources!) It’s also advisable to get 20 minutes of sunshine daily (weather permitting) – without sunscreen. Verdict: this is one of the natural testosterone supplements that work. Best Food Sources of Vitamin D3: Wild Alaskan Salmon (#1), Sardines, Eggs How To Take Vitamin D3: Using 3000-5000IU of Vitamin D3 per day is a good safe, research supported dose. Your physician can also test your blood for D3 levels for more precise monitoring.
Thus a steady dip of testosterone means that many problems start from the sexual to the psychological. These are all low testosterone symptoms. Low testosterone causes lack of libido, infertility and in some cases, erectile dysfunctions. More body fat, less muscle mass, fragile bones and fatigue are likely symptoms. Sleep issues and behavioral-emotional quirks are also frequent in men with a low testosterone count. The common sleep issues caused by low testosterone are insomnia and fragmented sleeping cycles. The typical behavioral emotional quirks are depression, degraded sense of well-being, fatigue, irritability, low motivation and self-confidence.

Unlike women, who experience a rapid drop in hormone levels at menopause, men experience a more gradual decrease of testosterone levels over time. The older the man, the more likely he is to experience below-normal testosterone levels. Men with testosterone levels below 300 ng/dL may experience some degree of low T symptoms. Your doctor can conduct a blood test and recommend treatment if needed. They can discuss the potential benefits and risks of testosterone medication, as well.


The sex hormone testosterone is far more than just the stuff of the alpha male's swagger. Though it plays a more significant role in the life of the biological male, it is actually present in both sexes to some degree. Despite popular perceptions that testosterone primarily controls aggression and sex drive—although it does play a role in both of those things—research has shown that individual levels of testosterone are also correlated with our language skills and cognitive abilities. Testosterone occurs in the body naturally, but can be administered as a medication, too: its most common uses are in the treatment of hypogonadism and breast cancer, as well as in hormone therapy for transgender men.
Why the difference? The discrepancy in findings between these studies is likely due to the initial training status and base testosterone levels of the subjects. While more research is warranted on this ingredient, D-AA is one of several ingredients suggested to be effective in boosting test levels, especially for older men whose natural testosterone levels have declined due to the natural course of aging.
Withania Somnifera is another name for Ashwagandha which is an ancient herb used as a medicine. It is an adaptogen because it helps the body to handle anxiety and stress. It improves T levels along with increasing sperm production. Other than improvement in sexual performance it also helps in fat loss, strength, and stamina. It reduces the stress by reducing the output of the cortisol hormone, which acts antagonist to testosterone. This reduction helps to body to trigger the testosterone production.
The sex hormone testosterone is far more than just the stuff of the alpha male's swagger. Though it plays a more significant role in the life of the biological male, it is actually present in both sexes to some degree. Despite popular perceptions that testosterone primarily controls aggression and sex drive—although it does play a role in both of those things—research has shown that individual levels of testosterone are also correlated with our language skills and cognitive abilities. Testosterone occurs in the body naturally, but can be administered as a medication, too: its most common uses are in the treatment of hypogonadism and breast cancer, as well as in hormone therapy for transgender men.

Disclaimer: The entire contents of this website are based upon the opinions of Dr. Mercola, unless otherwise noted. Individual articles are based upon the opinions of the respective author, who retains copyright as marked. The information on this website is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional and is not intended as medical advice. It is intended as a sharing of knowledge and information from the research and experience of Dr. Mercola and his community. Dr. Mercola encourages you to make your own health care decisions based upon your research and in partnership with a qualified health care professional. If you are pregnant, nursing, taking medication, or have a medical condition, consult your health care professional before using products based on this content.


Opioid substances are in common use both licit and illicit. Opiates are potent analgesics but they are also highly addictive. They are frequently prescribed for both acute and chronic pain and when used chronically, often induce opiate dependence in the user. Pain clinics regularly use narcotic agents in many of their patients. Methadone, in particular, is regularly prescribed to opiate addicts who have entered a program aimed at reducing narcotic dosage and ultimately weaning the patient off it altogether. Most men who are on chronic high doses of an opiate become hypogonadal. This was first recognized in the 1970’s when heroin addicts were found to have suppressed levels of testosterone (Brambilla et al 1977). Also suppressed were LH and FSH pointing to a probable inhibition of GnRH release.

There are three categories of healthy fat. Number one is healthy saturated fat. The truth about saturated fat is it’s actually good for you if it’s the proper kind. Healthy saturated fat is found in coconut oil and raw, fermented dairy products like goat milk kefir, yogurt, or raw goat or sheep milk cheese. However, avoid conventional dairy because it will actually damper your testosterone.
A study published in the Journal of Steroid Biochemistry studied the effects of diet on serum sex hormones in healthy men. Results showed that when men decreased their healthy fat intake, serum concentrations of androstenedione, testosterone and free testosterone also decreased. (8) This indicates you can add low testosterone to the list of low-fat diet risks.

The participants were seen every 4 weeks. Blood was taken to measure hormone levels, and questionnaires were given to assess physical function, health status, vitality, and sexual function. Body fat and muscle measurements were also taken at the beginning and end of the 16 weeks. The study was funded in part by NIH’s National Institute on Aging (NIA) and National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). Results appeared in the September 12, 2013, issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.
$(function(){ SocialButtonRound_OnLoad(); }); function OpenPopup(a, b, c, d, e, f) { var g, h, i, j, k, l = ""; if (1 == e) if ("REST" == f.toUpperCase() ? (j = rest_width, k = rest_height) : (j = onet_width, k = onet_height), navigator.userAgent.toUpperCase().indexOf("OPERA") == -1 && navigator.userAgent.toUpperCase().indexOf("MAC") == -1 || (k += 15), document.all) { var m = "no"; d && (m = "yes"), h = 0, i = 0, j = screen.width, k = screen.height; var n = "fullscreen=yes"; g = window.open(a, l, n) } else { j += 20, h = 0, i = 0, j = screen.width, k = screen.height; var n = "fullscreen=yes"; g = window.open(a, l, n) } else if (document.all) { var m = "no"; d && (m = "yes"), h = (screen.width - b) / 2, i = (screen.height - c) / 2; var n = "left=" + h + ",top=" + i + ",width=" + b + ",height=" + c + ",menu=no,address=no,resize=no,scrollbars=" + m + ",titlebar=no,status=no"; g = window.open(a, l, n) } else { b += 20, h = (screen.width - b) / 2, i = (screen.height - c) / 2; var n = "left=" + h + ",top=" + i + ",width=" + b + ",height=" + c + ",menu=no,address=no,resize=no,status=no"; g = window.open(a, l, n) } return g } function SocialButtonRound_OnLoad() { try { addLinksToShareIcon(), generateShareCount(document.location.href), $("ul.social-icons > li > a").not("a.mailtolink").click(function (a) { a.preventDefault(), etafScrollPos = $(document).scrollTop(), window._vis_opt_queue = window._vis_opt_queue || [], window._vis_opt_queue.push(function () { _vis_opt_goal_conversion(243) }); var b = $(this).parent("li").attr("data-social-btn"), c = $(this).attr("href"); switch (b) { case "facebook": OpenPopup(c, 670, 340, !1, 0, ""); break; case "print": window.print(); break; case "chat": break; default: console.log("Unsupported data-social-btn type: " + b) } return !1 }) } catch (a) { } } function addLinksToShareIcon() { var a = window.location, a.indexOf("?") >= 0 && (a = a.substring(0, a.indexOf("?"))); a.indexOf("#") >= 0 && (a = a.substring(0, a.indexOf("#"))); $('ul.social-icons > li[data-social-btn="facebook"] > a').attr("href", "https://www.facebook.com/sharer/sharer.php?u=" + encodeURIComponent(a)); } function generateShareCount(a) { a.indexOf("?") >= 0 && (a = a.substring(0, a.indexOf("?"))); a.indexOf("#") >= 0 && (a = a.substring(0, a.indexOf("#"))); if (a.indexOf("https://") > -1) { var b = encodeURIComponent(a); getFBCount(b) }; } function getFBCount(a) { $.ajax({ url: "https://graph.facebook.com/?fields=share&id=" + a, dataType: "jsonp", success: function (a) { a.share && ($("#shareCountContainer").val(Number($("#shareCountContainer").val()) + Number(a.share.share_count)), addToShareCountAndUpdate()) } }) } function addToShareCountAndUpdate() { if (!isNaN($("#shareCountContainer").val())) { var a = Number($("#shareCountContainer").val()); a >= 1e3 && (a = parseFloat((a / 1e3).toFixed(1)) + "K"), $("span[data-share-counter]").html(a) } }
14. Volek JS, Volk BM, Gómez AL, Kunces LJ, Kupchak BR, Freidenreich DJ, Aristizabal JC, Saenz C, Dunn-Lewis C, Ballard KD, Quann EE, Kawiecki DL, Flanagan SD, Comstock BA, Fragala MS, Earp JE, Fernandez ML, Bruno RS, Ptolemy AS, Kellogg MD, Maresh CM, Kraemer WJ. Whey protein supplementation during resistance training augments lean body mass. J Am Coll Nutr. 2013;32(2):122-35. PMID: 24015719
They also don't make clear how risky exposure to testosterone gel is for others—female partners, children, even pets. The gel is actually notorious for transferring to others. It can cause excess hair to grow on women's faces and arms, deepen their voices, interrupt menstruation, and make them anxious and irritable. In children, exposure to testosterone gels and creams can cause premature puberty and aggression. And in pets, it can cause aggressive behavior and enlargement of the genitalia.
If your levels are indeed low, there are a number of synthetic and bioidentical testosterone products on the market, as well as DHEA, which is the most abundant androgen precursor prohormone in the human body, meaning that it is the largest raw material your body uses to produce other vital hormones, including testosterone in men and estrogen in women.

Present in much greater levels in men than women, testosterone initiates the development of the male internal and external reproductive organs during foetal development and is essential for the production of sperm in adult life. This hormone also signals the body to make new blood cells, ensures that muscles and bones stay strong during and after puberty and enhances libido both in men and women. Testosterone is linked to many of the changes seen in boys during puberty (including an increase in height, body and pubic hair growth, enlargement of the penis, testes and prostate gland, and changes in sexual and aggressive behaviour). It also regulates the secretion of luteinising hormone and follicle stimulating hormone. To effect these changes, testosterone is often converted into another androgen called dihydrotestosterone. 
×