The most common "out of balance" testosterone levels are found to be on the low side of normal; this occurs because a male's highest testosterone level usually peaks at about age 20, and then it decreases slowly with age. It has been suggested that a 1% decrease in testosterone level per year is not unusual for middle-aged (30 to 50 years old) and older males. While this decrease may not be noticeable in some men, others may experience significant changes starting in their middle-aged years or more commonly at age 60 and above. This drop in testosterone levels is sometimes termed hypogonadism, "male menopause" or andropause.
However, along with bone healthy and density, vitamin D may also ensure proper testosterone production in men. Studies suggest a correlation between low testosterone levels and vitamin D deficiencies. Other research suggests that men supplementing with vitamin D experienced a statistically significant increase in testosterone levels. Studies found that simply spending more time in the summer sun increased the subjects’ vitamin D and testosterone levels.
Ashwagandha is shown to be effective at reducing cortisol which in turn helps with testosterone production. There are also numerous studies showing the effects on improving testosterone in infertile men (ref 80).  If you are using the Aggressive Strength product you don't need to supplement with ashwagandha as it's included in the test booster formula. Likewise if you're using Tian Chi (my daily herb drink).

Vitamin D, a steroid hormone, is essential for the healthy development of the nucleus of the sperm cell, and helps maintain semen quality and sperm count. Vitamin D also increases levels of testosterone, which may boost libido. In one study, overweight men who were given vitamin D supplements had a significant increase in testosterone levels after one year.5
After bombarding consumers with advertising, and massaging physicians with free meals and medical "information," the stage is set to seal the deal. "The fat guy has been seeing the ads on TV," said Fugh-Berman. "The doc has just come from a medical meeting where they were talking about how using testosterone can fight depression, etc., and they are being primed in a different way."
D-Aspartic acid is a natural amino acid involved in the synthesis and release of testosterone, which research shows can be used as a testosterone booster for infertile men. One 90-day study gave D-Aspartic acid to men with impaired sperm production, and found their sperm count rose from 8.2 million sperm per ml to 16.5 million sperm per ml, more than a 100 per cent increase.
Testosterone is about virility and vitality. It is the origin of manhood. Testosterone affects your sex drive, facial and body hair, sperm production, red blood cell production, muscle mass and strength. It also affects bone density and where the fat goes. Given the role that this single hormone plays in keeping us healthy and sexy. It should be vital for us to make sure that its levels are kept.
February 22, 2018 - Since our last review, the manufacturers of two of our top picks have gone out of business, and some new testosterone boosters have entered the arena. We’ve updated this review to evaluate the current field of testosterone supplements, as well as beef up analysis on what kind of results you can expect from t-boosters. Our only current top pick, Beast Sports Nutrition, is a new player in the industry that contains all four of the ingredients with studies showing a positive effect on testosterone.

Unlike women, who experience a rapid drop in hormone levels at menopause, men experience a more gradual decrease of testosterone levels over time. The older the man, the more likely he is to experience below-normal testosterone levels. Men with testosterone levels below 300 ng/dL may experience some degree of low T symptoms. Your doctor can conduct a blood test and recommend treatment if needed. They can discuss the potential benefits and risks of testosterone medication, as well.


How do you boost testosterone naturally? Testosterone is a male sex hormone. Low levels can cause changes to the distribution of body fat and muscle strength. Testosterone reduces with age, but people can boost it with lifestyle changes, including diet and exercise. Adequate sleep, nutritional supplements, and stress reduction may also help. Learn more here. Read now

How do you boost testosterone naturally? Testosterone is a male sex hormone. Low levels can cause changes to the distribution of body fat and muscle strength. Testosterone reduces with age, but people can boost it with lifestyle changes, including diet and exercise. Adequate sleep, nutritional supplements, and stress reduction may also help. Learn more here. Read now
A large number of trials have demonstrated a positive effect of testosterone treatment on bone mineral density (Katznelson et al 1996; Behre et al 1997; Leifke et al 1998; Snyder et al 2000; Zacharin et al 2003; Wang, Cunningham et al 2004; Aminorroaya et al 2005; Benito et al 2005) and bone architecture (Benito et al 2005). These effects are often more impressive in longer trials, which have shown that adequate replacement will lead to near normal bone density but that the full effects may take two years or more (Snyder et al 2000; Wang, Cunningham et al 2004; Aminorroaya et al 2005). Three randomized placebo-controlled trials of testosterone treatment in aging males have been conducted (Snyder et al 1999; Kenny et al 2001; Amory et al 2004). One of these studies concerned men with a mean age of 71 years with two serum testosterone levels less than 12.1nmol/l. After 36 months of intramuscular testosterone treatment or placebo, there were significant increases in vertebral and hip bone mineral density. In this study, there was also a significant decrease in the bone resorption marker urinary deoxypyridinoline with testosterone treatment (Amory et al 2004). The second study contained men with low bioavailable testosterone levels and an average age of 76 years. Testosterone treatment in the form of transdermal patches was given for 1 year. During this trial there was a significant preservation of hip bone mineral density with testosterone treatment but testosterone had no effect on bone mineral density at other sites including the vertebrae. There were no significant alterations in bone turnover markers during testosterone treatment (Kenny et al 2001). The remaining study contained men of average age 73 years. Men were eligible for the study if their serum total testosterone levels were less than 16.5 nmol/L, meaning that the study contained men who would usually be considered eugonadal. The beneficial effects of testosterone on bone density were confined to the men who had lower serum testosterone levels at baseline and were seen only in the vertebrae. There were no significant changes in bone turnover markers. Testosterone in the trial was given via scrotal patches for a 36 month duration (Snyder et al 1999). A recent meta-analysis of the effects on bone density of testosterone treatment in men included data from these studies and two other randomized controlled trials. The findings were that testosterone produces a significant increase of 2.7% in the bone mineral density at the lumber spine but no overall change at the hip (Isidori et al 2005). These results from randomized controlled trials in aging men show much smaller benefits of testosterone treatment on bone density than have been seen in other trials. This could be due to the trials including patients who are not hypogonadal and being too short to allow for the maximal effects of testosterone. The meta-analysis also assessed the data concerning changes of bone formation and resorption markers during testosterone treatment. There was a significant decrease in bone resorption markers but no change in markers of bone formation suggesting that reduction of bone resorption may be the primary mode of action of testosterone in improving bone density (Isidori et al 2005).
Testosterone levels generally peak during adolescence and early adulthood. As you get older, your testosterone level gradually declines — typically about 1 percent a year after age 30 or 40. It is important to determine in older men if a low testosterone level is simply due to the decline of normal aging or if it is due to a disease (hypogonadism).
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