If your need is greater though, there are other legal options to consider. DHEA is a precursor steroid hormone that is only available on prescription in the UK, but if taken under close supervision it can have dramatic effects. It must be taken under supervision though because too high a dose can cause mood changes and aggression — roid rage, in other words — as well as all the other unwanted by-products of too much testosterone.
Epidemiological evidence supports a link between testosterone and glucose metabolism. Studies in non-diabetic men have found an inverse correlation of total or free testosterone with glucose and insulin levels (Simon et al 1992; Haffner et al 1994) and studies show lower testosterone levels in patients with the metabolic syndrome (Laaksonen et al 2003; Muller et al 2005; Kupelian et al 2006) or diabetes (Barrett-Connor 1992; Andersson et al 1994; Rhoden et al 2005). A study of patients with type 2 diabetes using measurement of serum free testosterone by the gold standard method of equilibrium dialysis, found a 33% prevalence of biochemical hypogonadism (Dhindsa et al 2004). The Barnsley study demonstrated a high prevalence of clinical and biochemical hypogonadism with 19% having total testosterone levels below 8 nmol/l and a further 25% between 8–12 nmol/l (Kapoor, Aldred et al 2007). There are also a number longitudinal studies linking low serum testosterone levels to the future development of the metabolic syndrome (Laaksonen et al 2004) or type 2 diabetes (Haffner et al 1996; Tibblin et al 1996; Stellato et al 2000; Oh et al 2002; Laaksonen et al 2004), indicating a possible role of hypogonadism in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes in men. Alternatively, it has been postulated that obesity may be the common link between low testosterone levels and insulin resistance, diabetes and cardiovascular disease (Phillips et al 2003; Kapoor et al 2005). With regard to this hypothesis, study findings vary as to whether the association of testosterone with diabetes occurs independently of obesity (Haffner et al 1996; Laaksonen et al 2003; Rhoden et al 2005).
Robert Clark aka "The Troglodyte" is a 39 year old father of 3, Author, Fitness Trainer, Nutritional Researcher, Obstacle Course Racer, Avid Trail Runner and CrossFit Warrior. He is dedicated to helping others achieve their fitness goals. His extensive work in the field of natural testosterone elevation, inspired the creation of Alpha Wolf Nutrition where he serves as the Lead Product Researcher.

D-Aspartic acid is a natural amino acid involved in the synthesis and release of testosterone, which research shows can be used as a testosterone booster for infertile men. One 90-day study gave D-Aspartic acid to men with impaired sperm production, and found their sperm count rose from 8.2 million sperm per ml to 16.5 million sperm per ml, more than a 100 per cent increase.
Dr. Anthony’s Notes: Correcting a common zinc deficiency can really help testosterone levels. This is why many supplement companies make testosterone boosting supplement stacks called “ZMA” (which stands for Zinc-Magnesium Aspartate) – which is essentially a combination of zinc and magnesium. Do note that LONG TERM high dose zinc supplementation is NOT a good idea (above 30-40mg). Taking too much zinc can lead to a copper deficiency (the two minerals compete for absorption), which causes problems of its own. Verdict: this is one of the natural testosterone supplements that work. Best Food Sources: Beef, lamb, oysters, pumpkin seeds, cashews, quinoa, turkey, chickpeas How To Take Zinc: 30mg once per day with food is ideal. And as we alluded to above in my “notes,” it's often best to take zinc WITH the next supplement on our list…
Epidemiological studies suggest that many significant clinical findings and important disease states are linked to low testosterone levels. These include osteoporosis (Campion and Maricic 2003), Alzheimer’s disease (Moffat et al 2004), frailty, obesity (Svartberg, von Muhlen, Sundsfjord et al 2004), diabetes (Barrett-Connor 1992), hypercholesterolemia (Haffner et al 1993; Van Pottelbergh et al 2003), hypertension (Phillips et al 1993), cardiac failure (Tappler and Katz 1979; Kontoleon et al 2003) and ischemic heart disease (Barrett-Connor and Khaw 1988). The extent to which testosterone deficiency is involved in the pathogenesis of these conditions, or to which testosterone supplementation could be useful in their treatment is an area of great interest with many unanswered questions.
Similar to the cruciferous veggies, you can also use coconut oil in many ways. You could use it as a cooking medium or for those light oil brushes for baking sessions. You can change the butter with coconut oil for that bowl of popcorn on movie night. Seeing the link between coconut oil and testosterone, it would be an error not to put it in your diet.
A study out of the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor in Belton, Texas, examined the effects of fenugreek supplementation on strength and body composition in resistance-trained men. Researchers found that while both the placebo and fenugreek groups significantly increased their strength during the first four weeks, only the fenugreek group saw significant increases in strength after eight weeks of training and supplementation.[5]
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