There's a pretty dizzying amount of research backing up this regime as a solid option to enhance your health, lower cholesterol, and encourage healthy, lasting weight loss. DASH (the acronym stands for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) has you loading up on fruits, vegetables, and whole grains (surprise!) and removing foods high in saturated fat from your diet. Research also shows that this diet may even ward off the onset of type 2 diabetes.
For instance, you might crave popcorn at the movies, or may want candy in the afternoon at work. To deal with the temptation, you could replace the snack you crave with something that’s a better fit for your diet. For instance, you might bring a bag of plain popcorn to the movies, which is a healthy alternative. Similarly, you could eat a single square of dark chocolate each afternoon instead of your typical candy selection.
You already know that a perfect diet doesn't exist, but many of us still can't resist the urge to kick ourselves when we indulge, eat too much, or get thrown off course from restrictive diets. The problem: This only makes it more difficult, stressful, and downright impossible to lose weight. So rather than beating yourself up for eating foods you think you shouldn't, let it go. Treating yourself to about 200 calories worth of deliciousness each day — something that feels indulgent to you — can help you stay on track for the long-haul, so allow yourself to eat, breathe, and indulge. Food should be joyful, not agonizing!
Gastrointestinal disorders are another common cause of unexplained weight loss – in fact they are the most common non-cancerous cause of idiopathic weight loss.[citation needed] Possible gastrointestinal etiologies of unexplained weight loss include: celiac disease, peptic ulcer disease, inflammatory bowel disease (crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis), pancreatitis, gastritis, diarrhea and many other GI conditions.
The good news is that if you're struggling with your size, reducing your calorie intake and increasing your activity level have been clinically shown to help you lose weight. The bad news is that there are no shortcuts and no short-term fixes. Fad diets, herbal supplements, "fat-burning" pills, and highly restrictive diets don't work for long, if at all, and some may cause more harm than good.
Thank you for sharing your journey. I’m a mother of 5 and I homeschool. I’m 39 and 40 pounds overweight. I’ve never been over weight and I’m struggling. I emotionally eat all day, everyday and my weight just keeps creeping up. I’ve hoped the Lord would tell me to fast so maybe I’d lose weight but He knows that’s not the right heart and so do I. I’ve been praying for something to stand out, something that will help me desire to make a change. I’ve been feeling lost and hopeless. After reading your blog here, I’m crying and praying because I feel like this might be my answer to prayer. I stumbled upon your story accidentally and I’m finding myself feeling the Lord all over it. Thank you! Through praying now, tears and not believing in myself because I ALWAYS fail, I’m hoping that maybe, just maybe this might be the time. Thank you!
It may seem obvious to set realistic weight-loss goals. But do you really know what's realistic? Over the long term, it's best to aim for losing 1 to 2 pounds (0.5 to 1 kilogram) a week. Generally to lose 1 to 2 pounds a week, you need to burn 500 to 1,000 calories more than you consume each day, through a lower calorie diet and regular physical activity.

Nicole Morrissey is a registered dietitian who works specifically with diabetes and weight management. What sets her apart from many other dietitians is that she’s struggled with her own weight since a young age. She was 14 when she went to her first Weight Watchers meeting, and the years that followed brought many ups and downs. Today, she accepts that she “may forever be a work in progress,” so she focuses on balance. That means healthy, good-for-her foods, and doing the active things she loves, like running and hockey. Visit the blog.
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